Category Archives: Uncategorized

A stupid country

Examples of Australia’s slide towards being a stupid country


September 2012:

on one of the ABC quizzes the other night “Which major western nation was founded in 1778”. The listener (middle aged souniding with Australian accent) wanted a clue, and was told ‘major’ is the clue. She then said history wasn’t her strong point (why the hell do people like that ring up a quiz) and then proceeded to say “oh, Australia”.
A few callers earlier another of those quiz-nitwits phoned: A young woman who was asked a question about a country in Europe. She said ‘geography wasn’t her strong point’ and she didn’t really know much about Europe and asked the announcer is Italy was a country in Europe.

 


Private schools hard done by, says Abbott

21 Augustg 2012

OPPOSITION Leader Tony Abbott has provoked a storm of controversy and contradicted the findings of the Gonski review into school funding by suggesting that state schools receive too large a share of education spending.

Labor and the Coalition yesterday used an independent education forum to talk up their private-school credentials in the lead-up to the federal government’s long-awaited overhaul of school funding.

Prime Minister Julia Gillard promised every independent school in the nation would receive an increase in funding, and defended big private schools as ”a great example”.

<p></p>

Mr Abbott went further, implying that private schools were being treated unjustly by receiving a smaller proportion of funding than state schools.

”Overall, the 66 per cent of Australian school students who attend public schools get 79 per cent of government funding. The 34 per cent of Australians who attend independent schools get just 21 per cent of government funding,” Mr Abbott told the forum.

”So there is no question of injustice to public schools here. If anything, the injustice is the other way.”

Illustration: Ron Tandberg.Illustration: Ron Tandberg.

This contradicts the review led by businessman David Gonski, which recommended an annual $5 billion increase in funding to all schools, but with an emphasis on increased funding to state schools because they have a higher proportion of disadvantaged students.

The review found that more than 80 per cent of students who could not ”participate in society” because they were so far behind in reading and mathematics were in state schools: ”The concentration of this problem in government schools is evidence of the need for a greater increase in resources in those schools in particular.”

Australian Education Union president Angelo Gavrielatos said Mr Abbott’s comments betrayed an ignorance of the Gonski review and proved he would be the ”private school prime minister”.

Trevor Cobbold, of the public education lobby group Save Our Schools, said Mr Abbott showed a ”callous disregard” for the large proportion of disadvantaged students who were not receiving an adequate education.

”It’s a disgrace. Low-income students are on average two to three years behind their high-income peers. If we are going to do anything about the massive achievement gaps in this country, government schools need to receive the bulk of any funding increases,” he said.

But Mr Abbott said the whole Gonski process was in part generated by the idea that the government somehow neglected state schools, and the risk was that funding for private schools might be cut.

Ms Gillard seized on his comments, claiming in Parliament that every state school in the country was ”on the opposition hit-list”.

In the ensuing argument, Mr Abbott was thrown out of Parliament by Deputy Speaker Anna Burke, making him the first opposition leader ejected since John Howard in 1986.

Mr Abbott had been asked to withdraw a remark that was inaudible in the public gallery. ”I withdraw, but it’s still an untrue statement,” he replied.

”You could not help yourself,” said Ms Burke, telling him to leave for an hour.

He returned to declare that he had no intention of cutting funding to state schools. His office said any such suggestion was ”just another lie”.

Earlier, Ms Gillard moved at the independent education forum to dispel any lingering notions of class envy from the days of former leader Mark Latham’s private school ”hit-list”.

”I’ve never looked at a big independent school in an established suburb and thought ‘That’s not fair, ”’ she said. ”I look at a big independent school in an established suburb and think ”That’s a great example.”’

Melbourne University professor Richard Teese said the Prime Minister’s speech represented a betrayal of Labor’s position on public education. ”It’s completely a reversal of its historic position,” he said. ”It’s gradually acclimatised itself to a close position with private schools, despite the inequities that creates.

”There are big lobby groups and they have a lot of political clout and the government is being forced to pay a price for what it sees as fundamental reforms.”

But Independent Schools Victoria chief executive Michelle Green said parents would be happy to hear that both leaders supported them. ”Many of our parents feel they are not very well supported, when they do put their own money into their child’s education.”

 

http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/books/harry-potter-banned-by-christian-school-20120824-24q7i.html

Harry Potter banned by Christian school

Medowie Christian School has defended a decision to ban witches and warlocks from its annual book week parade and the Harry Potter series from the school library.

The school was one of many in the Hunter Valley that marked Book Week this week by asking children to dress up as their favourite book character for a parade.

Frankly, we do not want any of our younger students or their siblings feeling frightened, intimidated or uncomfortable during any school activities. 

Principal Samantha Van de Mortel asked parents not to send children to school on Wednesday as witches and warlocks because it was inconsistent with school values.

She said it was a standing policy because the school felt it was not in line with its Christian ethos.

“We just don’t believe that’s something we want to promote. We promote a Christian focus,” Ms Van de Mortel said.

She said the parade was a primary school event that was also open to students’ younger siblings and they were concerned many retail costumes were quite gruesome.

“Frankly, we do not want any of our younger students or their siblings feeling frightened, intimidated or uncomfortable during any school activities,” she said.

While witches, warlocks and Harry Potter characters were out at the Medowie school, the characters allowed in the parade included Anakin Skywalker, The Mad Hatter and the Gingerbread Man.

Ms Van de Mortel said the Harry Potter series, which is about witches and wizards, was not available in the school library because it had been the subject of many international debates.

It topped the list as the 10 Most Challenged Books of the 21st Century by the American Library Association.

“Medowie Christian School respects the right of parents to make decisions on whether or not to allow/encourage their child to read material,” Ms Van de Mortel said.

“In respecting that right [we] do not stock books from the Harry Potter Series, or indeed other titles, which are the subject of polarising public discussion.”

Medowie mother Bobbie Antonic, whose children do not attend the school, raised the issue on social networking site Twitter and said she was concerned it was censorship.

“I was just blown away by it. It’s just bizarre,” she said.

“Books are not reality.”

Medowie Christian School Parents and Friends Association manager Lisa Taylor said from a parent’s point of view the prohibition was “no big deal”.

“In the lead up to Halloween the shops are full of so many grotesque, frightening costumes and I’ve got two little boys,” she said. “It’s supposed to be a celebration of literature.”

She said parents were happy the school library did not send students home with books that could force a topic up for discussion.

“I would like to be able to make that choice for my own kids,” Ms Taylor said


and this one, when Harry Potter was banned by a Christian School in 2001:

Aust school bans Harry Potter

The World Today Archive – Friday, 23 November , 2001  00:00:00

Reporter: Luisa Saccotelli

COMPERE: As the publicity and marketing machine for the release of the first Harry Potter movie ramps up, it is being claimed that Harry Potter books may be encouraging a worldwide reading resurgence. But one independent Australian school has decided to ban JK Rowling’s famous books about the fictitious young wizard.

In Melbourne the Nunawading Adventist College has refused to allow the books on its library shelves and has banned pupils in the junior school from actually bringing their own personal copies into the school. Luisa Saccotelli in Melbourne reports that the school has been holding Parents Information Night, describing the books as “tools of the devil”.

LUISA SACCOTELLI: What’s wrong with Harry Potter? The Nunawading Seventh Day Adventist College and Primary School fears plenty. Why does Harry have a lightning bolt on his forehead? – the school asks in a flyer to parents. Do they really teach witchcraft?

[EXTRACT FROM HARRY POTTER MOVIE]: Understand this Harry this is very important. Not all wizards are good.

I’m going to bed before either of you come up with another clever idea to getting killed. Or worse, expelled!

LUISA SACCOTELLI: A school newsletter urges parents to be informed about this tool of the devil.

[EXTRACT FROM HARRY POTTER MOVIE]: And the word of two 13-year-old wizards will not convince anybody. A street full of eyewitnesses swore they saw Sirius murder Pettigrew.

PARENT, ROBERT: Their stance against his sort of material I think is fairly narrow-minded and I think it’s trying to enforce an attitude amongst the students and families that they shouldn’t do anything other than what aligns itself with the strict church doctrine.

LUISA SACCOTELLI: Robert is the father of two daughters at the Nunawading Adventist College. He doesn’t support the Potter books ban.

ROBERT: It’s part of the general school policy because the school is part of the Seventh Day Adventist Church system, that they actively discourage any involvement in anything that doesn’t align itself with t he church doctrine.

[EXTRACT FROM HARRY POTTER MOVIE]: Quick. Where are we going to go? Where are we going to hide? The Dementors will be coming any moment.

LUISA SACCOTELLI: The school’s chaplain, Sue Beament, says her concerns about the Potter books are biblically based.

SUE BEAMENT: Probably our biggest concern would be that they are based on witchcraft and wicker. These themes and all the symbols that are used are actually – really are actual witchcraft themes. Even Harry Potter’s name. Potter is the name of the Mother-God in witchcraft.

LUISA SACCOTELLI: the school also fears kids will be drawn into the occult.

SUE BEAMENT: There’s going to be some kids who are drawn in to the darker side of occult and if you don’t believe that witchcraft and occult really do exist, you only need to go up and ask around the Dandenongs and a few other places to discover that this is a darker side of life and one that I would not be happy to see my children dabble in.

LUISA SACCOTELLI: How do you think Harry Potter would draw them towards that though?

SUE BEAMENT: Because all of the – Rowling is the author – is a very highly intelligent lady and she has used the symbols and knowledge of witchcraft. I’m not saying she’s a witch. I never – that I’d like struck out of this interview.

[EXTRACT FROM HARRY POTTER MOVIE]: It took a few seconds for the absurdity of this statement to sink in. Then Ron voiced what Harry was thinking.

LUISA SACCOTELLI: Robert, whose children attend the school is upset they’re being made to feel they’ve done something wrong in reading the Potter books.

ROBERT: It’s written in the vein of fantasy and fairytale. One of my children is an Enid Blyton fan and look to take anything like that literally would be preposterous as well.

Story of The Christmas Tree – Oh Tannenbaum

Contrary to some popular stories it was not Martin Luther who introduced the Christmas Tree to Germany.

Legend associates the first Christmas tree with St. Boniface and the German town of Geismar. Sometime in Boniface’s lifetime (c. 672-754) he is said to have cut down the sacred tree of Thor in Geismar, replacing it with a fir tree which has been said to have been the first Christmas tree. The word Tannenbaum, a German word for “fir tree”, can be understood to be a “Christmas tree” although the literal meaning of “Christmas tree” is encapsulated in the word “Weihnachtsbaum.”


 Glaubenskrieg um den Tannenbau

http://www.dw-world.de/dw/article/0,,4998564,00.html

geschmückter Weihnachtsbaum (Foto: AP)

Tannenbaum und Krippe stehen in deutschen Wohnzimmern friedlich nebeneinander. Früher wäre das undenkbar gewesen. Denn viele Weihnachtsbräuche gehen auf den Kulturkampf zwischen Protestanten und Katholiken zurück.

 

Es ist ein trautes Bild, das die Herzen vieler Protestanten höher schlagen ließ: Martin Luther sitzt mit seiner Familie in der guten Stube um einen kleinen, geschmückten Tannenbaum. “Luther mit seiner Familie am Christabend 1536 zu Wittenberg” nannte der Weimarer Hofkupferstecher Carl August Schwerdgeburth sein Gemälde. Doch das Bild, das ihn im 19. Jahrhundert berühmt machte, war eine glatte Lüge.

Gemälde mit der Familie Martin Luthers neben einem Weihnachtsbaum (Foto: Ullstein-Bild)Weihnachten bei Luthers?“Luther saß nie unterm Tannenbaum”, sagt der Bonner Volkskundler Alois Döring. Im Gegenteil. Der Reformator kannte überhaupt noch keinen Weihnachtsbaum. Erste Zeugnisse für eine Feier mit geschmückter Tanne stammen laut Döring aus dem Elsass, wo ein Stadtrat Ende des 16. Jahrhundert den ersten Weihnachtsbaum aufgestellt haben soll.

Spott über die “Weihnachtsbaumreligion”

In Mode kam die geschmückte Tanne aber erst um 1800, als protestantische Familien sie sich ins Wohnzimmer stellten. Und später behaupteten, dies in guter evangelischer Tradition zu tun. “Die Katholiken spotteten über den Lutherkult ebenso wie über den evangelischen Tannenbaumbrauch und bezeichneten den Protestantismus sogar als Weihnachtsbaumreligion”, erzählt der Bonner Volkskundler.

Allerdings nicht lange, denn schon Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts hielt der geschmückte Baum auch in katholische Wohnzimmer Einzug. “Entscheidend für seine Verbreitung war der deutsch-französische Krieg von 1870”, berichtet Döring. “Damals wurden auf Anweisung der Heeresleitungen in den Schützengräben Weihnachtsbäume aufgestellt als Zeichen der Verbundenheit mit der Heimat.”

Vom Paradiesspiel zum Tannenbaum

Weihnachtsbaum vor der Börse in New York (Foto: dpa)Lichterglanz in New YorkDiese Aktion wirkte offensichtlich weit in die Welt hinaus. Denn der erste öffentliche, auf einem Platz ausgestellte und mit Lichtergirlanden geschmückte Baum stand an Weihnachten im Jahr 1910 nicht in Deutschland, sondern in New York. Mit der überkonfessionellen Verbreitung des Weihnachtsbaumes verschwand allmählich auch die Lutherlegende. Dafür hält sich bis heute das Gerücht, dieser Weihnachtsbrauch entstamme einem heidnischen Kult. Doch weit gefehlt.

“Laut neueren Erkenntnissen der Forschung geht der Weihnachtsbaum auf die Paradiesspiele der mittelalterlichen Kirche zurück”, betont Döring. Dort sei er am 24. Dezember als “Baum der Erkenntnis” aufgestellt worden, unter dem der Sündenfall Adams und Evas nachgespielt wurde. “Auf der Seite, die die Erlösung symbolisieren sollte, war der Baum mit Äpfeln und anderen Leckereien geschmückt, auf der anderen, sündigen Seite nicht.” Nach den Gottesdiensten durfte der Baum geplündert werden.

Heiliger Christ kontra Nikolaus

Dabei konnte es zeitweise ganz schön hoch hergehen, erzählt Döring. Genau wie bei den Krippenspielen und Nikolausfeiern, bei denen katholische Gläubige gerne auch mal Sitte und Moral vergaßen. Dem Reformator Martin Luther gefiel die sinnenfrohe Heiligenverehrung der katholischen Kirche gar nicht. Er wollte Christus wieder in den Mittelpunkt der Feiern stellen und erfand deshalb die Figur des “heiligen Christ” als Konkurrenz zum Nikolaus.

Als ein Engel verkleidetes Mädchen schmückt einen Weihnachtsbaum (Foto: dpa)Christkind, 1910Lange Jahre bescherte in den protestantischen Gegenden Deutschlands der “heilige Christ” die Kinder, begleitet von Engeln. Im Laufe der Jahrhunderte sei aus ihm das engelsgleiche “Christkind” geworden, berichtet der Volkskundler. Doch das war offenbar zu lieb und so erfand man im 19. Jahrhundert noch den Weihnachtsmann, der eher ein “umgemodelter Nikolaus” war. Ob diese Figur eher auf die Phantasie von Protestanten oder Katholiken zurückgeht, lässt sich heute nicht mehr sagen.

“Viele unserer Weihnachtsbräuche sind mittlerweile überkonfessionell”, meint Döring. Gerade in der Advents- und Weihnachtszeit beobachtet der Volkskundler in den letzten Jahren zahlreiche ökumenische Aktionen. Katholiken und Protestanten veranstalten gemeinsam Konzerte und Feste. “Die Kirchen haben erkannt, dass sie etwas dafür tun müssen, wenn Weihnachten mehr sein soll als Konsum, Glühwein und Lichterschmuck”, sagt Döring. “Und das geht am besten mit- statt gegeneinander.”

Autorin: Sabine Damaschke

Redaktion: Klaus Krämer


An einen Zweig hängten sie kleine, aus farbigem Papier ausgeschnittene Netze, und jedes Netz war mit Zuckerwerk gefüllt. Vergoldete Apfel und Walnüsse hingen herab,als wären sie festgewachsen,und über hundert rote, blaue und weiße kleine Lichter wurden in den Zweigen festgesteckt.

Hans Christian Andersen, aus “Der Tannenbaum”

 

 

  • Die GeschichteStechpalmen und Klausenbäume
  • Tannenbaumzubehör
  • Mode für Christbäume
  • Die Symbolik des Christbaumschmucks
  • Tipps zum Tannenbaumkauf!
  • Soll man in der heutigen Zeit zu Weihnachten überhaupt einen Baum aufstellen?
  • Wie viele Nadeln hat wohl ein Christbaum?

    DIE GESCHICHTE

    Die meisten von uns können sich Weihnachten ohne einen Tannenbaum gar nicht vorstellen. Nicht nur in Deutschland scheint ein christbaum einfach zum Fest zu gehören, doch das war nicht immer so wie heute.

    Die altgermanischen Wurzeln, die man ihm oft zuspricht, hat es so wohl nie gegeben, obwohl grüne Zweige in vielen Kulturen im Winter das wiederkehrende Leben symbolisierten und böse Geister vertreiben sollten, vermutlich holte man sie wohl auch bereits ins Haus.

    Die Geschichte, dass Martin Luther, inspieriert von einem mondbeglänzten Tannenbaum auf dem Weihnachtsspaziergang, den ersten Christbaum aufgestellt habe, ist eine Legende, auch wenn es Bilder der Luther-Familie unter einem geschmückten Tannenbaum gibt, so sind sie doch erst lange nach Luthers Tod entstanden.

    Die erste echte schriftliche Kunde von einem geputzten Baum am Weihnachtsabend stammt aus Freiburg im Jahre 1419. Die Bäcker hatten einen Baum mit Naschwerk, Früchten und Nüssen behängt, den die Kinder an Neujahr plündern durften. schaft hatte einen Baum mit allerlei Naschwerk, Früchten und Nüssen behängt, den die Kinder nach Abschütteln an Neujahr plündern durften. Spätere Berichte kommen auch aus Straßburg und Türckheim/Elsass. Noch waren es keine Familienbäume wie heutzutage, doch sicherlich für die Menschen Symbole für den Baum im Paradiesgarten.

    1604 berichtet dann ein Reisender erstmals über Familienbäume: “Auf Weihnachten richtet man Dannanbäum’ zu Straßburg in den Stuben auf, daran hänket man Rosen aus vielfarbigem Papier geschnitten, Äpfel, Oblaten, Zischgold, Zucker etc. Man pflegt darum ein viereckigen Rahmen zu machen…”.

    In der ersten Hälfte des 18. Jhdts. werden solche Berichte dann häufiger, doch es dauerte noch ein Weilchen, bis der Tannenbaum sich verbreitete, zunächst in protestantischen Gegenden, und später dann auch in Gebieten, wo die Bevölkerung hauptsächlich katholisch war und noch lange die Krippe den Mittelpunkt des Weihnachtsfestes bildete. Dass die Herzogin von Orleans,, wohl besser bekannt als “Lieselotte von der Pfalz, in einem Brief aus dem Jahr 1708 an ihre Tochter von Kindheitserinnerungen an Weihnachtsbäume schreiben konnte, ist wohl eine Ausnahme. Erst gut 100 Jahre später wurden an königleichen und kaiserlichen Höfen Europas Tannenbäume aufgestellt. Meistens brachten die Ehefrauen den Brauch quasi mit in die Ehe, oder sie ließen, wie Queen Victoria von England 1840, ihren Männern zuliebe Bäume aufstellen.

    Danach verbreitete sich der christbaum schnell in der ganzen Welt. Kaum 50 Jahre hat dieser friedliche “Eroberungsfeldzug gedauert. Auf dem Gebiet der Volksbräuche ist das einmalig!


    STECHPALMEN UND CLAUSENBÄUME

    Für die “kleinen Leute” waren Fichten und Tannen, die meistens aus Staatsforsten oder herrschaftlichen Wäldern kamen, meistens viel zu teuer. Stattdessen nahm man vielfach Stechpalmen oder auch Buchsbäume, in der Brandenburgischen Gegend auch märklische Kiefern. Lange Zeit waren auch Gestecke verbreitet, die den Tannenbaum ersetzen sollten. So benutzte man im Norden sogenannte Bügel- oder Reifenbäume, bei denen in mehreren Etagen grün umwundene Bügel oder Reifen an einem Holzstock befestigt wurden. Im Süden gab es die sogenannten Klausenbäume, pyramidenförmige Gestecke aus Äpfeln und mit Tannenzweigen besteckten Holzstäben.

    Erst später, als die Nachfrage immer größer wurde, legte man spezielle Schonungen an und die Tannen wurden auch für weniger betuchte Leute erschwinglich, und die “Provisorien” verschwanden nach und nach von der Bildfläche. Heute werden sie manchmal zusätzlich in den Stuben aufgestellt, aber den “richtigen” Tannenbaum können sie meist nicht mehr ersetzen.

     

    TANNENBAUMSCHMUCK UND ZUBEHÖR

    • Tannenbaumfuß:

      Zunächst hängte man in vielen Gegenden die Bäume oft einfach an die Decke. Manchmal wurde an den Fuß ein Apfel gehängt. Noch bis Anfang des 20. Jhdts. war das durchaus üblich, z. B. in Thüringen und in der Pfalz. Manchmal hingen die Bäume übrigens mit der Spitze nach unten, als Symbol für die Dreieinigkeit.

      Später wurden selbst gezimmerte Gestelle üblich aus kreuzweise übereinander befestigten Latten (manchmal verwendet man solche Heimwerker-Gestelle heute noch, wenn der Tannenbaumfuß mal wieder unauffindbar ist…). Schließlich kamen die eisernen Tannenbaumständer auf, die im Jugendstil wunderschön verziert wurden und jetzt zu hohen Preeisen auf dem Flohmarkt gehandelt werden. Neuerdings gibt es auch Tannenbaumfüße mit Wasserreservoir, in denen die Bäume länger frisch bleiben.

       

    • Tannenbaumschmuck:Brennende Kerzen

      wurden am Anfang nicht verwendet, denn sie waren einfach zu teuer. Lichterbäume kamen erst spät auf, und man dachte sich allerhand aus, um auf die immer noch kostspieligen Wachskerzen verzichten zu können. So gab es kleine Öllämpchen, die mit einem angelöteten Dorn auf die Zweige gesteckt werden konnten. “Richtige” Kerzen konnte das wohl nicht ersetzen, so wurde wohl auf manche Weihnachtswünsche verzichtet, um “echte”Wachskerzen für den Baum kaufen zu können.1879 erfand Thomas Edison die Glühlampe, und schon ein paar Jahre später wurden auch die ersten Christbäume elektrisch beleuchtet. Die Idee verbreitete sich erstaunlich schnell, obwohl zuerst nur wenige Haushalten einen Stromanschluss hatten. Da eine komplette elektrische Tannenbaumbeleuchtung zunächst mal eine ziemlich teure Angelegenheit war, konnten sich am Anfang nur reiche Leute so etwas leisten. In Amerika gab es damals extra sogenannte “Wiremen”, die kamen, um die Bäume zu verkabeln, weil sich “normale” Menschen das nicht zutrauten! Es gab in den USA damals übrigens auch schon künstliche Tannenbäume, sie waren aus Stahl gefertigt und konnten teilweise mit Gas beleuchtet werden.

      Tannenbaumschmuck:

    Zuerst wurde der Baum mit einfachen Dingen geschmückt: Äpfel (die den Paradiesapfel symbolisieren sollten, der Adam und Eva in Versuchung führte und den Tod in dieWelt brachte), Papierrosen (sie weisen hin auf die Erlösung in der Christnacht) und farbige Bänder und Fäden. Schließlich wurden die Sachen vergoldet, die den Christbaum schmücken sollten. Es gab vergoldete Äpfel und Nüsse, und sogar, obwohl man es kaum glauben kann, vergoldete Kartoffeln. Auch Süßigkeiten waren an den Bäumen zu finden, und schließlich auch Flitter und Zischgold, Engelshaar und Glassschmuck.
    Der Glasschmuck gewann schnell an Bedeutung. Entwickelt wurde er in der kleinen Stadt Lauscha in Thüringen, wo heute noch herrliche Kugeln und anderer Schmuck hergestellt wird. Es gab gläsernes Obst, Nüsse, Tannenzapfen, Kugeln, Weihnachtsmänner, Vögel mit Schwänzen aus echten Federn, Musikinstrumente, kleine Lokomotiven und vieles mehr. So manche Sachen kann man übrigens auch heute wieder kaufen. Meistens waren es die Frauen, die den Glasschmuck, sorgsam verpackt auf dem Rücken in großen Kiepen zu fuß kilometerweit zu den Handelshäusern tragen mussten. Anfangs, bevor die Händler sich in Lauscha niederließen, mussten die Frauen sogar bis nach Nürnberg laufen.

    In Nürnberg und Fürth entstand damals eine richtige Industrie für Christbaumschmuck. Aus Messingblech stellte man Zischgold und Leonische Drähte (gibt es heute auch wieder, allerdings ganz schön teuer!) her, außerdem Lametta aus Blei. Man konnte filigrane Bleisterne kaufen, Nikoläuse, Obst und Gemüse aus Pappmaché, aus silbern kaschiertem Karton gab es Schlittengespanne und Sterne. Im Erzgebirge wurden die auch heute noch bekannten Figuren gedrechselt, Hemdenmatzengelchen, Schaukelpferdchen, und vieles mehr.

    MODE FÜR CHRISTBÄUME

    Anfangs waren die Bäume möglicht bunt, aber dann gab es um 1950 eine Gegenbewegung. Die Christbäume wurden ganz in weiß und silber geschmückt. In den Frauenzeitschriften dieser Zeit kann man aber auch Anleitungen finden mit bunten Schleifen und Strohkränzchen. Inzwischen wechseln die modischen Farben für den Christbaum Jahr für Jahr. Immer aber gab es Menschen, die ihren Baum einfach so geschmückt haben, wie es ihnen gefiel, und das ist ja auch gut so!

    DIE SYMBOLIK DES BAUMSCHMUCKS

    Im Laufe der Zeit haben sich die Dinge, die als Schmuck an den Weihnachtsbaum gehängt werden, sehr verändert. Man kann dabei durchaus eine Symbolik nachweisen, auch wenn es nicht immer nur christlich ist, was da zu Tage kommt!

    • Äpfel: Sie stehen natürlich für den Paradiesapfel, zudem haben sie als runde Früchte auch eine Ewigkeitssymbolik wie Kugeln.
    • Bären: Sie stehen für Kraft.
    • Engel: Die Engel am Christbaum stehen für die Engel, die den Hirten Jesu Geburt verkündet haben. Außerdem stehen sie als Himmelsboten für eine Verbindung zwischen Gott und den Menschen.
    • Fische: Sie sind ein Symbol für den christlichen Glauben.
    • Geschenkpäckchen: Heute hängt man die Weihnachtsgeschenke ja nicht mehr in den Baum. Aber früher war das schon der Fall, undzwar möglichst an die oberen Äste, damit die Kinder sie nicht vorzeitig auspacken konnten. Inzwischen sind es wohl nur noch künstlerische Leerpäckchen, die den Baum zieren. Beiden gemeinsam ist die Symbolik: Sie stehen für die Geschenke, die die drei Weisen zur Krippe brachten.
    • Glocken: Sie stehen für die Kirchenglocken, die zur Heiligen Nacht läuten und die frohe Botschaft verkünden. Gleichzeitig sind sie auch ein Glückssymbol und sollen Unglück von Haus und Hof fern halten.
    • Gold und Silber: Der heute so beliebte Glitzerschmuck steht für die kostbaren Gaben der drei Weisen.
    • Herz: Ein Herz steht für das Herz Jesu, gleichzeitig symbolisiert es Lebenskraft und Liebe.
    • Kleine Häuser: Sie stehen für Geborgenheit.
    • Kugeln: Wie ein Kreis haben sie keinen Anfang und kein Ende und stehen damit für die Ewigkeit. Zudem symbolisieren sie die Paradiesäpfel.
    • Lametta: 1878 in Nürnberg entwickelt, symbolisiert es glitzernde Eiszapfen
    • .Lichter: Ob Kerzen oder Lichterkette, beides steht für die Wiederkehr des Lichts. In der christlichen Symbolik ist das natürlich die Geburt Jesu.
    • Mond: Er ist ein Symbol für Werden und Vergehen.
    • Nüsse: Mit ihnen sind Gedanken an Natur und Fruchtbarkeit verbunden. Sie tragen den Lebenskeim in sich und deuten damit an, dass das Leben weiter gehen wird, obwohl man es in der harten Schale noch nicht sehen kann. Vergoldete Nüsse wirken besonders strahlend und lebendig.
    • Puppen: Puppen sind Zukunftssymbole, gleichzeitig symbolisieren sie auch das Jesuskind.
    • Sterne: Sterne stehen symbolisch für Licht und Sonne und für die Hoffnung auf ein gütiges Schicksal. Gleichzeitig symbolisieren sie den Stern von Bethlehem, der für das Licht Jesu steht.
    • Strohschmuck: Sterne und anderer Schmuck aus Stroh sollen daran erinnern, dass das Jesuskind in der Krippe auf Stroh lag.
    • Trompeten: Trompeten haben sich aus den Posaunen der Engel entwickelt und sind somit ein Symbol für Engel. Gleichzeitig stehen sie für die Verkündigung der großen Neuigkeit von Christi Geburt, denn früher wurden bei der Verkündigung von Neuigkeiten auf den Marktplätzen oft Trompeten verwendet.
    • Zapfen: Einerseits als Tannenzapfen ein Fruchtbarkeitssymbol, andererseits als Eiszapfen ein Symbol für den Winter.
    • Weihnachtsfarben Grün und Rot: Grün für das wiederkehrende Leben und Rot für das Blut Christi.

Christmas miscellany

 

Put the “X” back in XMAS

The Thinking Atheist    Dec 20, 2010 9:52 AM | Date Modified: Nov 13, 2011 6:29 PM

If you look at history, mythology and even the holy bible, you’ll notice that Jesus isn’t the Reason For The Season.

If you look at history, mythology and even the holy bible, you’ll notice that Jesus isn’t the Reason For The Season.

Every year at this time, on cue, an entire culture cries foul over the term XMAS, proclaiming that Christ is being systematically deleted from his own birthday. And after all, Jesus is (to quote the cliché) the Reason For The Season.

XMAS is an insult to Christ.

These people write newspaper articles. They do clips on the evening news. They shower Facebook with emphatic posts and requests to click “like” for anyone who’s ready to do battle against the heathen onslaught with a daring new FB page.

They do everything EXCEPT a little homework. A little pre-knee-jerk research would have revealed that the X comes from the Greek letter Chi, which is the first letter of the Greek word Χριστ?ς, translated “Christ.”

XMAS is CHRISTmas.

But the protests continue, as frothing religious communities wail about the War On Christmas. They picket in the streets and boycott holiday events because the true story of the sweet baby Jesus is why the holiday exists in the first place. Right?

Sigh. Those pesky facts.

December 25th was a date selected by the church, because no actual birth date for Jesus could be determined. It is the time of the Winter Solstice, and December 25th is also the traditional birthday of the Persian sun god, Mithra, whose birth legend includes shepherds, Magi, gifts, miracles, disciples and a virgin birth. Other influences on the Jesus story include:

* Attis: a Roman Pagan god. Born December 25th. Crucified as a man. Spent 3 days in the underworld and arose on Sunday as a solar deity for the new season. Accounts of Attis take place 200 years before the story of Christ.

* Dionysus: a Greek Pagan god. Born December 25th. Worshipped throughout the Middle East, especially Jerusalem. He was viewed as the son of Zeus.

* Osiris: an Egyptian Pagan god. Three wise men announced his birth. He was called the King of Kings. Worship of Osiris was established throughout the Roman Empire a century before the birth of Christ.

* Babylonians: the festival of Saturnalia (the Festival of Saturn), celebrated December 17-23 in the Roman Empire as a tribute to the god, Saturn, ultimately combined into a single holy day: December 25th.

* Scandinavia: the Norse celebration of Yule from December 21st through January. In recognition of the return of the sun, the men would bring home logs to burn, and the people would feast until the last ember waned (often for many days).

* Oden: the German Pagan god, honored mid-Winter. The people were terrified of Oden, as the legend has him making nocturnal flights through the sky to observe mankind, deciding who to bless, and who to punish.

Other Christmas traditions?

* The Christmas tree? Pagan in orgin. The early Egyptians saw evergreen trees as a symbol of life over death. Around the Winter Solstice, they’d bring green date palm leaves into their homes.

* Mistletoe? Pagan in origin. The early Druid priests often used evergreen plants and mistletoe in Pagan ceremonies. The mistletoe plant was the symbol of “the birth of a god.” Kissing under the mistletoe is a Pagan symbol of love and harmony.

* The exchange of gifts? Pagan in origin. The practice of gift giving originally stemmed from the early Roman feast of Saturn (Saturnalia). Charity towards others was also a common practice at this time.

In fact, Santa Claus arguably has a more verifiable origin than the baby Jesus story. Jollly ol’ Saint Nick is based on Nicholas, the Bishop of Myra, named as a saint in the 19th century.

But let’s stick with Jesus. And for just a moment, let’s examine the suspiciously contradictory, biblical account of this amazing tale.

* The book of Matthew has Mary and Joseph residing in Bethlehem in Judea. Luke places them in Galilee.

* Matthew says the birth of Jesus occurred during the reign of Herod the Great of Judea, and coincides with a census ordered by emperor Augustus at the time that Quirinius (Cyrenius) was the Roman governor of Syria (Luke 2:1-3). But Rome didn’t rule Judea until 6 A.D. A full decade had to have separated Herod and Quirinius. And if a census did happen, it was long after Herod’s death, making the story of the infant massacre historically impossible.

* Luke says Joseph took Mary (in the last stages of pregnancy) on an arduous four-day trek to participate in the census. Yet Roman tradition was to register only men (not women), in the place or town of their local taxation district, which was much more practical. A 60-mile trek would not have been required, nor would the participation of Mary.

* Matthew 1:20 says an angel had previously appeared to Joseph. But Luke 1:28 says that the angel appeared before Mary.

* The book of Matthew has 28 generations between David and the birth of Jesus. Luke has 41 generations for the same period.

* Matthew says Jesus’ grandfather (on Joseph’s side) is Jacob, while Luke says the grandfather is Heli.

* Matthew 2:11 says Jesus’ birth took place in a house. Luke’s account says Jesus’ birth took place in a manger (feeding trough), because there was no room in the inn.

* And the virgin birth? Not so much. Matthew apparently misread the Greek Septuagint of Isaiah 7:14, (mistranslating the Hebrew word “almah,” which doesn’t mean “virgin.” It translates, “young woman of marriageable age” or “young maiden.”) The virginity angle was mostly likely added to the story because, culturally, it was often claimed that important people had miraculous births. Plato was said to be the offspring of the god Apollo. Alexander The Great was said to have been conceived when a thunderbolt impregnated his mother, Olympias. Buddha’s birth story includes elephants in the sky. Confucius has dragons in the Heavens.

* The three kings? In the book of Matthew, they were magoi (astronomers), not kings. There’s no mention of “three,” and the entire account contradicts Luke’s account, which has Jesus being visited by local shepherds.

* After Jesus’ birth, Matthew says the family immediately fled to Egypt for several years to escape Herod’s wrath (Matt. 2:13-14). But Luke has them returning immediately to Nazareth.

* The book of Luke says that John The Baptist was a relative of Jesus and knew he was the divine Christ, even in the womb (Luke 1:41,44). But in the same book (Luke 7:19-23), the adult John The Baptist didn’t know who Jesus was.

Ultimately, the evidence shows that much of the early December 25th holiday had nothing to do with Christ. And the biblical account we cherish is wildly contradictory, unverifiable, nonsensical and (romantic as it may be) plagiarized from other, earlier myths.

I’m a fan of Christmas. I enjoy loved ones, illuminated displays, trees, stockings, gifts, the classic Christmas songs, hot chocolate and pumpkin pie. But I also celebrate the season knowing that those plastic nativity displays are actually more real than the fantastic tale they represent.

And as millions defiantly erect Pagan symbols while defending a Christian savior story, it’s a chance for the rest of us to smile warmly, offer them a cup of hot cider, and wish them a Merry XMAS.

-enIf you look at history, mythology and even the holy bible, you’ll notice that Jesus isn’t the Reason For The Season.

Every year at this time, on cue, an entire culture cries foul over the term XMAS, proclaiming that Christ is being systematically deleted from his own birthday. And after all, Jesus is (to quote the cliché) the Reason For The Season.

XMAS is an insult to Christ.

These people write newspaper articles. They do clips on the evening news. They shower Facebook with emphatic posts and requests to click “like” for anyone who’s ready to do battle against the heathen onslaught with a daring new FB page.

They do everything EXCEPT a little homework. A little pre-knee-jerk research would have revealed that the X comes from the Greek letter Chi, which is the first letter of the Greek word Χριστ?ς, translated “Christ.”

XMAS is CHRISTmas.

But the protests continue, as frothing religious communities wail about the War On Christmas. They picket in the streets and boycott holiday events because the true story of the sweet baby Jesus is why the holiday exists in the first place. Right?

Sigh. Those pesky facts.

December 25th was a date selected by the church, because no actual birth date for Jesus could be determined. It is the time of the Winter Solstice, and December 25th is also the traditional birthday of the Persian sun god, Mithra, whose birth legend includes shepherds, Magi, gifts, miracles, disciples and a virgin birth. Other influences on the Jesus story include:

* Attis: a Roman Pagan god. Born December 25th. Crucified as a man. Spent 3 days in the underworld and arose on Sunday as a solar deity for the new season. Accounts of Attis take place 200 years before the story of Christ.

* Dionysus: a Greek Pagan god. Born December 25th. Worshipped throughout the Middle East, especially Jerusalem. He was viewed as the son of Zeus.

* Osiris: an Egyptian Pagan god. Three wise men announced his birth. He was called the King of Kings. Worship of Osiris was established throughout the Roman Empire a century before the birth of Christ.

* Babylonians: the festival of Saturnalia (the Festival of Saturn), celebrated December 17-23 in the Roman Empire as a tribute to the god, Saturn, ultimately combined into a single holy day: December 25th.

* Scandinavia: The Norse celebration of Yule from December 21st through January. In recognition of the return of the sun, the men would bring home logs to burn, and the people would feast until the last ember waned (often for many days).

* Odin: the Norse god, honored mid-Winter. The people were terrified of Odin, as the legend has him making nocturnal flights through the sky to observe mankind, deciding who to bless, and who to punish.

Other Christmas traditions?

* The Christmas tree? Pagan in origin. The early Egyptians saw evergreen trees as a symbol of life over death. Around the Winter Solstice, they’d bring green date palm leaves into their homes.

* Mistletoe? Pagan in origin. The early Druid priests often used evergreen plants and mistletoe in Pagan ceremonies. The mistletoe plant was the symbol of “the birth of a god.” Kissing under the mistletoe is a Pagan symbol of love and harmony.

* The exchange of gifts? Pagan in origin. The practice of gift giving originally stemmed from the early Roman feast of Saturn (Saturnalia). Charity towards others was also a common practice at this time.

In fact, Santa Claus arguably has a more verifiable origin than the baby Jesus story. Jollly ol’ Saint Nick is based on Nicholas, the Bishop of Myra, named as a saint in the 19th century.

But let’s stick with Jesus. And for just a moment, let’s examine the suspiciously contradictory, biblical account of this amazing tale.

* The book of Matthew has Mary and Joseph residing in Bethlehem in Judea. Luke places them in Galilee.

* Matthew says the birth of Jesus occurred during the reign of Herod the Great of Judea, and coincides with a census ordered by emperor Augustus at the time that Quirinius (Cyrenius) was the Roman governor of Syria (Luke 2:1-3). But Rome didn’t rule Judea until 6 A.D. A full decade had to have separated Herod and Quirinius. And if a census did happen, it was long after Herod’s death, making the story of the infant massacre historically impossible.

* Luke says Joseph took Mary (in the last stages of pregnancy) on an arduous four-day trek to participate in the census. Yet Roman tradition was to register only men (not women), in the place or town of their local taxation district, which was much more practical. A 60-mile trek would not have been required, nor would the participation of Mary.

* Matthew 1:20 says an angel had previously appeared to Joseph. But Luke 1:28 says that the angel appeared before Mary.

* The book of Matthew has 28 generations between David and the birth of Jesus. Luke has 41 generations for the same period.

* Matthew says Jesus’ grandfather (on Joseph’s side) is Jacob, while Luke says the grandfather is Heli.

* Matthew 2:11 says Jesus’ birth took place in a house. Luke’s account says Jesus’ birth took place in a manger (feeding trough), because there was no room in the inn.

* And the virgin birth? Not so much. Matthew apparently misread the Greek Septuagint of Isaiah 7:14, (mistranslating the Hebrew word “almah,” which doesn’t mean “virgin.” It translates, “young woman of marriageable age” or “young maiden.”) The virginity angle was mostly likely added to the story because, culturally, it was often claimed that important people had miraculous births. Plato was said to be the offspring of the god Apollo. Alexander The Great was said to have been conceived when a thunderbolt impregnated his mother, Olympias. Buddha’s birth story includes elephants in the sky. Confucius has dragons in the Heavens.

* The three kings? In the book of Matthew, they were magoi (astronomers), not kings. There’s no mention of “three,” and the entire account contradicts Luke’s account, which has Jesus being visited by local shepherds.

* After Jesus’ birth, Matthew says the family immediately fled to Egypt for several years to escape Herod’s wrath (Matt. 2:13-14). But Luke has them returning immediately to Nazareth.

* The book of Luke says that John The Baptist was a relative of Jesus and knew he was the divine Christ, even in the womb (Luke 1:41,44). But in the same book (Luke 7:19-23), the adult John The Baptist didn’t know who Jesus was.

Ultimately, the evidence shows that much of the early December 25th holiday had nothing to do with Christ. And the biblical account we cherish is wildly contradictory, unverifiable, nonsensical and (romantic as it may be) plagiarized from other, earlier myths.

I’m a fan of Christmas. I enjoy loved ones, illuminated displays, trees, stockings, gifts, the classic Christmas songs, hot chocolate and pumpkin pie. But I also celebrate the season knowing that those plastic nativity displays are actually more real than the fantastic tale they represent.